Best restaurants in Tallinn in 2018 by White Guide Nordic

Restaurants are assessed by 30 representatives of the food media, from whom 12 are from Estonia and 18 from abroad. Every place is judged several times with half of the judges being local and half of them from abroad. Judges visit the restaurants anonymously, decide by themselves what to order, and also pay the bill on spot. Focus of the evaluation is on food (maximum of 40 points) while drink list (maximum of 20 points), service (maximum of 25 points) and milieu (maximum of 15 points) are also taken under consideration. Maximum points that a restaurant can receive is 100. Based on the assessment the restaurants are divided into categories.

Global Masters Level restaurants

There are two global masters level restaurants in Estonia. Such restaurants must receive minimum 85 points in total and at least 35 points of them for food.

Restaurant Noa
Alexander Chef´s Table

Masters Level restaurants

There are two masters level restaurants in Tallinn. These restaurants must receive minimum 75 points in total and at least 32 points of them for food.

Juur

Very Fine Level restaurants

In 2018 there are 16 high class restaurants in Tallinn. Restaurants receiving minimum 67 points in total and at least 28 points for food qualify in the high class restaurants’ category.

Fine Level restaurants

There are all together 18 fine level restaurants in Tallinn and in the city’s surroundings. A fine level restaurant has received at least 60 points in total during the evaluation with minimum 22 points for food.Tuljak 

 

Book your private Tallinn tour here:

www.estonianexperience.com

Tallinn Tours
sales@nordicexperience.com
www.nordicexperience.com
Private tours in Tallinn with passion!

Follow Nordic Experience on Facebook

Estonia is Europe’s Most Underrated Country by New York Post

After all, no one knew anything about the European country — which is three times smaller than New York state — so it was a plausible home for the mysterious exchange student.

Larger than both Denmark and Holland, but with a population of just 1.3 million, it’s easy to take advantage of both city and country — especially since about 50 percent of the country is uninhabited forest.Twenty-five years after the film’s release, Estonia still seems off the beaten path. (Even though the now ubiquitous phone-imitating app Skype was founded in Estonia, and most locals won’t let you forget it!) But it’s well worth a visit.

Less obvious to visitors is the country’s continued tech savvy: Residents use a coded government identification card to pay bills and taxes — and even cast all votes in elections — from home.

Flights from New York to Estonia start at about $800 round-trip on Finnair via Helsinki this winter. Here are the Baltic nation’s four major cities worth exploring, especially for first-timers.

Tallinn

Cityscape of Tallinn. Estonia
The fairy-tale capital of Estonia is the best-preserved medieval city in northern Europe, with winding cobblestone streets and incredible architecture. Once was home to wealthy merchants from neighboring countries, Tallinn’s historic center — called the Old Town — is now filled with restaurants, bars, museums and galleries, with a healthy mix of locals and visitors.

Though keen observers will notice a wide array of handsome historic churches — practically one on every other corner — only about a quarter of the population is affiliated with any religion, making Estonia one of the least religious countries in the world. (Don’t let that stop you from enjoying Tallinn’s multitude of gorgeous Gothic spires.)

Read the full article here: https://nypost.com/2017/12/12/a-guide-to-europes-most-underrated-country/